Sign In | Create an Account | Welcome, . My Account | Logout | Subscribe | Submit News | Contact Us | Home RSS
 
 
 

If The Shoe Fits

January 28, 2014
by Dan Voigt , Emmetsburg News

The last offering I brought to this forum dealt with the general topic of sportsmanship. So, as I've followed up on the topic, The following selection is titled, "What Makes A Nightmare Sports Parent - And What Makes A Great One", by Steve Henson, and is offered for your consideration.

Hundreds of college athletes were asked to think back: "What is your worst memory from playing youth and high school sports?"

Their overwhelming response: "The ride home from games with my parents."

The informal survey lasted three decades, initiated by two former longtime coaches who over time became staunch advocates for the player, for the adolescent, for the child. Bruce E. Brown and Rob Miller of Proactive Coaching LLC are devoted to helping adults avoid becoming a nightmare sports parent, speaking at colleges, high schools and youth leagues to more than a million athletes, coaches and parents in the last 12 years.

Those same college athletes were asked what their parents said that made them feel great, that amplified their joy during and after a ballgame.

Their overwhelming response: "I love to watch you play."

There it is, from the mouths of babes who grew up to become college and professional athletes. Whether your child is just beginning T-ball or is a travel-team soccer all-star or survived the cuts for the high school varsity, parents take heed.

The vast majority of dads and moms that make rides home from games miserable for their children do so inadvertently. They aren't stereotypical horrendous sports parents, the ones who scream at referees, loudly second-guess coaches or berate their children. They are well-intentioned folks who can't help but initiate conversation about the contest before the sweat has dried on their child's uniform.

In the moments after a game, win or lose, kids desire distance. They make a rapid transition from athlete back to child. And they'd prefer if parents transitioned from spectator or in many instances from coach back to mom and dad. ASAP.

Brown, a high school and youth coach for more than 30 years, says his research shows young athletes especially enjoy having their grandparents watch them perform.

"Overall, grandparents are more content than parents to simply enjoy watching the child participate," he says. "Kids recognize that."

A grandparent is more likely to offer a smile and a hug, say "I love watching you play," and leave it at that.

Meanwhile a parent might blurt out

"Why did you swing at that high pitch when we talked about laying off it?"

"You didn't hustle back to your position on defense."

"You would have won if the ref would have called that obvious foul."

And on and on.

Sure, an element of truth might be evident in the remarks. But the young athlete doesn't want to hear it immediately after the game. Not from a parent. Comments that undermine teammates, the coach or even officials run counter to everything the young player is taught. And instructional feedback was likely already mentioned by the coach.

Brown and Miller, a longtime coach and college administrator, use their platform to convey to parents what three generations of young athletes have told them.

"Everything we teach came from asking players questions," Brown says. "When you have a trusting relationship with kids, you get honest answers."

So what's the takeaway for parents?

"Sports is one of few places in a child's life where a parent can say, 'This is your thing,' " Miller says. "Athletics is one of the best ways for young people to take risks and deal with failure because the consequences aren't fatal. We're talking about a game. Let them play the game, and that way all successes and failures are theirs."

Then the discussion on the ride home can be about a song on the radio or where to stop for a bite to eat. By the time you pull into the driveway, the relationship ought to have transformed from keenly interested spectator and athlete back to parent and child: "We loved watching you play. Now, how about that homework?"

For my part, I think its time for all of us to stop, find the good in the efforts of our young people, and let them know that we do appreciate it.

 
 
 

 

I am looking for:
in:
News, Blogs & Events Web